Tomorrow I check out of physician assistant school year one, which means I need to present all my notes from patients, preceptor evaluations, etc. to show that I’ve met my PA program’s clinic requirements.

Once I’ve checked out officially, I’ll be a second year physician assistant student, at which point, the pace in the clinic and my upcoming hospital rotations will accelerate.  I will see MANY more patients ( I saw 170 between January 2011 and September 2011, but between October 2011 and June 2012, I will see over 1000!  Crazy!)

Since I’m looking over all my notes, I thought it would be interesting to post a list of the complaints/diagnoses from the patients that I saw at my clinic for one week.  I took the history, performed the exams, presented them to my preceptor, and gave him my assessment of all of the cases I saw.  Then I completed most of them with him, and then wrote up the progress note.

My List for One Week’s Worth of Patients

Though many of them had more than one thing going on, I’m only mentioning one or at most two diagnoses so as not to provide identifiable information on patients (confidentiality first!).  The list represents 4 days in the clinic.  Once I’m a PA, this will likely represent 1 day, the cases will be more complicated, and I’ll be on my own a lot more.

  1. Lacerated forearm after a sports injury
  2. Infant with diarrhea x 1 week
  3. Injured wrist from FOOSH (Fall On OutStretched Hand))
  4. New skin lesion on arm
  5. Pharyngitis
  6. Back sprain
  7. Back sprain (different patient)
  8. Anxiety
  9. Sinusitis with headache
  10. Complete physical exam
  11. Diabetes & hypertension for medication change
  12. Dizziness with bradycardia
  13. Catch up vaccinations (catch up means that the patient is behind and needs to make up missed doses))
  14. Newly diagnosed severe diabetes
  15. Ankle sprain
  16. Numbness in feet
  17. Throbbing mass in a leg
  18. Low back pain after a motor vehicle accident
  19. Knee sprain
  20. DMV physical exam
  21. Extreme fatigue x 1 month
  22. Follow up for seizures after ER visit

I wish I could provide details and tell all the stories that go with these complaints.  Believe me, there were some interesting ones behind some of them.  I guess wisdom is realizing how much you don’t know, and if that’s the case, I guess I’m a wise man.  There feels like more than I’ll ever know, but I’ve been assured by my preceptors (a PA and an MD) that my knowledge and skills are right on target, and they’re now going to start “pushing” me more.